Worship

October: Service and Activism 


While spiritual practice is often a personal matter characterized by reflection and meditation, at times, external circumstances require that we reveal our spiritual commitments by taking action, speaking out and getting to work.  The invigorating chill of fall – coupled with knowledge of the impending winter – may add energy and urgency to our intentions to engage in meaningful service.  Which causes inspire you to get involved?  How do your gifts, skills, and interests match with opportunities to respond to pressing needs? How can we best become agents of change in a world where every action matters?

October 15: Bells for Old John Brown
Rev. Dr. Leon Dunkley
Music: Diane Mellinger & NC Choir and Sandi Anderson
Service Coordinator: Veronica Delay

One hundred and fifty-eight years ago, on October 16th in 1859, a band of radical abolitionists led by a man named John Brown set out to raid an arsenal in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.  He was unsuccessful.  It was one of the most important failures in U.S. history and it led—almost inexorably—to the American Civil War.  John Brown was sentenced to death for what he did.  Ralph Waldo Emerson declared that his hanging would “make the gallows as glorious as the cross.”  As Vermont officially recognizes the contributions of John Brown, we reflect upon the nature of this complicated man.  We will talk about who he was and about what we are now because of him.

October 22: Being At One with Hosea Ballou
Rev. Dr. Leon Dunkley
Music: Diane Mellinger & NC Choir
Service Coordinator: Shoshana Belisle

From his quiet home in Barnard, VT (just six, short miles from North Chapel), Hosea Ballou, one of the strongest voices in Universalism sat down at his desk to write.  The result was The Treatise on Atonement, a 19th-century approach to a central concept in western theology.  But how does it have meaning for us today?  How might it inform our activism?

October 29: Beware of the Dragon—Reflections on Halloween
Rev. Dr. Leon Dunkley
Music: Diane Mellinger with Guest David William Ross
Service Coordinator: Chis Bartlett

The seasons are changing.  From autumn, we are moving into winter.  The days grow short as we near the time of darkness.  Haunting ghost come playfully into view.  They call your name.  It’s a magical time of tricks and treats and intriguing celebrations.


 Children’s Spiritual Exploration Schedule

Spiritual Exploration for Children begins September 10th. Please join us for a fun gathering and welcome back celebration for the children!

Childcare is provided in the parlors throughout the year for ages birth to 5 years. Our Spiritual Exploration program for elementary aged children in grades K-6 & 7-8 will be held during the school year, where we introduce children to the UU principals through yoga, mindfulness, creative arts, music, community service and connection to the Natural world.

SE Schedule for 2017/20108

October 8: Prep for Pancake Breakfast on Oct 15
October 15: Pancake Breakfast before church: Music as a Spiritual Practice with Michael Z
October 22: CHaD Hero: Run4Ryland
October 29: Expressive Arts and Drumming with Ben and Murray at North Chapel
November 5: CTWK and Geraldine begin work on Christmas Hearts Project
November 12: Music as a Spiritual Practice with Michael Z
November 19: Spiritual Exploration with Jess and Geraldine

More information on the Children’s SE program is available online! For any questions or ideas please speak to Geraldine or email office@northchapelvt.org.

*Change The World Kids—Rising*

This is a collaboration with the Change The World Kids that is going into its 3rd year. We gather monthly with a member or members of Change The World Kids to get involved and learn about local, national and international community service work.  Contact the office if you are interested in learning more office@northchapelvt.org.

OWL (Our Whole Lives) Grades 4,5,6

Our Whole Lives (OWL) is a sexuality education curriculum that helps participants of all ages make informed and responsible decisions about their sexual health and behavior. The North Chapel is the gauging the interest of parents whom might like to sign their children up for this class.

Learn More


Announcement about Spiritual Themes Second & Third Quarter 2017

In the coming year, the NUCS Worship Committee seeks to cultivate greater spiritual continuity by establishing monthly themes to guide future services. These broad themes, which have intentionally been expressed in expansive language with plenty of room for exploration and interpretation, are designed to reflect the essence of each season, drawing our attention to topics and concepts that naturally emerge as the year progresses. You are all invited to review the proposed themes and to consider how they resonate with your personal experience. If you or someone you know might be able to bring us on journeys through these territories, please contact a member of the Worship Committee.

October: Service and Activism

While spiritual practice is often a personal matter characterized by reflection and meditation, at times, external circumstances require that we reveal our spiritual commitments by taking action, speaking out and getting to work.  The invigorating chill of fall – coupled with knowledge of the impending winter – may add energy and urgency to our intentions to engage in meaningful service.  Which causes inspire you to get involved?  How do your gifts, skills, and interests match with opportunities to respond to pressing needs? How can we best become agents of change in a world where every action matters?

November: Resilience and the Dark Night

There is a time in every person’s life when the landscape feels barren and when resources seem to run dry. Once the beautiful bounty of autumn crests and transforms into a luminous yet solemn winter, we may be challenged to remain engaged, stimulated, and enthusiastic about our inner and outer pursuits.  The nights may become longer and darker, but a spark of light always remains present if we have the steadiness of attention to notice and stoke it.  This season presents an opportunity to discover deeper resources, to fuel the inner fire, and to find comfort in connection.  Where do you turn when the dark night falls?  How are you able to summon resilience when facing obstacles on your spiritual path?

December: Community and Connection

Prompting us to gather snugly around the hearth, winter’s chill has the power and potential to knit neighbors closer together.  For some, however, a need to retreat may take hold.  Sacred and secular celebrations remind us of the importance of staying connected so that we can better weather the storm.  While inspiring joy for some, the rituals and rites of the season can also trigger challenges worthy of investigation.  What is your relationship with this busy season and how can we re-negotiate our values and priorities to make it the holidays as nourishing as possible?  How can we balance our needs for solitude with our needs as social beings?  How can we honor the lessons and intentions of the season while staying true to our deepest truths?


Previous Sunday Service Notes